The removal act of 1830 in the united states

He dismissed romantic portrayals of lost Indian culture as a sentimental longing for a simpler time in the past, stating that "progress requires moving forward. Many Muscogee Creek had already emigrated west under earlier treaties. In his State of the Union address in December,Andrew Jackson proposed that the president of the United States be authorized to exchange land in the west for Indian land in the east and to assist the Indians with their "removal".

By Cherokee territory had been reduced to the point that they felt they could cede no more. President Jackson hoped that removal would resolve the Georgia crisis.

The Indian Removal Act of 1830

The appetite of the settlers for land would not abate, so the Indians adopted a strategy of appeasement. Further, he believed that he could only accommodate the desire for Indian self-rule in federal territories, which required resettlement west of the Mississippi River on federal lands.

When Andrew Jackson assumed office as president of the United States inhis government took a hard line on Indian Removal policy. Jackson portrayed his paternalism and federal support as a generous act of mercy. The Indians were tranquil, but sombre and taciturn.

Andrew Jackson —37 vigorously promoted this new policy, which became incorporated in the Indian Removal Act of To achieve his purpose, Jackson encouraged Congress to adopt the Removal Act of Many of these Indians had homes, representative government, children in missionary schools, and trades other than farming.

Inpressure for Indian removal to the west greatly increased after the Cherokee adopted a constitution and a republican form The removal act of 1830 in the united states government modeled on that of the United States and began publishing a bi-lingual newspaper, the Cherokee Phoenix.

Only a small number remained, and around 3, were removed in the war. The act authorized the president to grant Indian tribes unsettled western prairie land in exchange for their desirable territories within state borders especially in the Southeastfrom which the tribes would be removed.

In they agreed to accept financial compensation for their land. This acculturation was originally proposed by George Washington and was well under way among the Cherokee and Choctaw by the turn of the 19th century.

This scheme forced the national government to pass the Indian Removal Act on May 28,in which President Jackson agreed to divide the United States territory west of the Mississippi into districts for tribes to replace the land from which they were removed.

The Cherokee National Council passed a law that required Council approval of any future land transfers, and the penalty for violating the law was death. Your warriors have known me long. When the Choctaw reached Little Rock, a Choctaw chief referred to the trek as a "trail of tears and death".

Even more reluctant to leave their native lands were the Florida Indians, who fought resettlement for seven years —42 in the second of the Seminole Wars. Many Indian nations did make land cessions in following years.

Indian removal The Removal Act paved the way for the forced expulsion of tens of thousands of American Indians from their land into the West in an event widely known as the " Trail of Tears ," a forced resettlement of the Indian population.

The idea of land exchange, that is, that Native Americans would give up their land east of the Mississippi in exchange for a similar amount of territory west of the river, was first proposed by Jefferson in and had first been incorporated in treaties inyears after the Jefferson presidency.

Senators and Congressmen on both sides of the issue introduced many memorials from their constituents supporting or opposing the bill. He then forced upon the Indians a treaty whereby they surrendered to the United States over twenty-million acres of their traditional land—about one-half of present day Alabama and one-fifth of Georgia.

Although the majority of the Cherokee and their elected government disavowed this treaty, the United States used it as the basis for forcing the Cherokee to remove to the west in However, Andrew Jackson sought to renew a policy of political and military action for the removal of the Indians from these lands and worked toward enacting a law for Indian removal.

By the end of his presidency, he had signed into law almost seventy removal treaties, the result of which was to move nearly 50, eastern Indians to Indian Territory—defined as the region belonging to the United States west of the Mississippi River but excluding the states of Missouri and Iowa as well as the Territory of Arkansas—and open millions of acres of rich land east of the Mississippi to white settlers.

Indian removal

Friends and Brothers — By permission of the Great Spirit above, and the voice of the people, I have been made President of the United States, and now speak to you as your Father and friend, and request you to listen. If you accept that connection, it may not be too much of a stretch to say that the Indian Removal Act played a role in sending the entire United States down a Trail of Tears.

James Monroe argued that the Indian tribes in the Southeast should exchange their land for lands west of the Mississippi River, they did not take steps to make this happen.

The Senecas asserted that they had been defrauded, and sued for redress in the U. Inthe Louisiana Purchase transferred title of a vast area west of the Mississippi River from France to the United States, giving Jefferson the means to not only honor the deal with Georgia, but also to solve the "Indian problem" in the eastern U.

As incentives, the law allowed the Indians financial and material assistance to travel to their new locations and start new lives and guaranteed that the Indians would live on their new property under the protection of the United States Government forever.

The rapid settlement of land east of the Mississippi River made it clear by the mids that the white man would not tolerate the presence of even peaceful Indians there. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.Indian Removal Act: Indian Removal Act, (May 28, ), first major legislative departure from the U.S.

policy of officially respecting the legal and political rights of the American Indians. The act authorized the president to grant Indian tribes unsettled western prairie land in exchange for their desirable.

The Indian Removal Act of "Removal" of the Native people east of the Mississippi to lands in the west as a policy of the United States originated with Thomas Jefferson, who was elected President in Indian Treaties and the Removal Act of From a legal standpoint, the United States Constitution empowered Congress to “regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian tribes.

” In early treaties negotiated. The Indian Removal Act was signed into law by Andrew Jackson on May 28,authorizing the president to grant unsettled lands west of the Mississippi in exchange for Indian lands within existing state borders. A few tribes went peacefully, but many resisted the relocation policy.

During the fall and winter of andthe Cherokees were forcibly moved west by the United States. This scheme forced the national government to pass the Indian Removal Act on May 28,in which President Jackson agreed to divide the United States territory west of the Mississippi into districts for tribes to replace the land from which they were removed.

Indian removal was a forced migration in the 19th century whereby Native Americans were forced by the United States government to leave their ancestral homelands in the eastern United States to lands west of the Mississippi River, specifically to a designated Indian Territory (roughly, modern Oklahoma).

The Indian Removal Act was signed by .

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The removal act of 1830 in the united states
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